On June 8, 2021, the White House released its report analyzing the risks associated with supply chains for four key U.S. sectors – semiconductor manufacturing and advanced packaging; large capacity batteries; critical minerals and materials; and pharmaceuticals and advanced pharmaceutical ingredients.  The report, Building Resilient Supply Chains, Revitalizing American Manufacturing, and Fostering Broad-Based Growth,

On March 26, 2021, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced that it will hold a virtual forum on April 8, 2021 to allow the public to address policy objectives and concerns over President Joseph Biden’s Executive Order 14017, which seeks to address the need for resilient, diverse and secure

The Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has issued a notice seeking public comment on the risks in the semiconductor manufacturing and advanced packaging supply chains. This request is a direct result of President Joseph Biden’s recent Executive Order 14017 and the need for resilient, diverse, and secure supply chains for critical

On December 22, 2020, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued formal notification in the Federal Register of its addition of 77 entities to its Entity List. BIS determined that these entities are “engaging in or enabling activities contrary to U.S. national security and foreign policy interests.”  While these listings were

On December 18, 2020, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued a brief press statement announcing that it has “added” more than 60 entities to the Entity List, including Chinese company Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC), in order to “protect U.S. national security.” The Chinese companies include entities that enable human

On October 15, 2020, the White House released a report, “National Strategy for Critical and Emerging Technologies,” outlining steps the United States will take to preserve its competitive edge in certain critical and emerging technologies. Noting in a statement the importance of U.S. dominance in the science and technology sectors, the White House

On June 25, 2020, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced that it would be delaying the effective date for certain filing requirements set forth in April 2020 regulations on military-related exports to China, Russia and Venezuela. After significant pushback from industry representatives that more time was needed to transition to

Due to continuing concerns with Huawei Technologies and its non-U.S. affiliates accessing and using U.S. technology and software to design and manufacture its semiconductors, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced that it will further tighten export restrictions on the Chinese conglomerate. Commerce’s  Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) will amend its foreign-produced direct product rule

As reported in a prior post, the United States on July 6, 2018 began imposing 25 percent tariffs on approximately $34 billion worth of Chinese products imported into the United States. This was the result of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) undertaking a Section 301 investigation into “China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation.” Shortly after these tariffs were implemented, China retaliated by imposing tariffs on $34 billion worth of U.S. exports to China. In response, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced yesterday, July 10, 2018, “As a result of China’s retaliation and failure to change its practices, the President has ordered USTR to begin the process of imposing tariffs of 10 percent on an additional $200 billion of Chinese imports.” He added, “For over a year, the Trump Administration has patiently urged China to stop its unfair practices, open its market, and engage in true market competition. We have been very clear and detailed regarding the specific changes China should undertake. Unfortunately, China has not changed its behavior – behavior that puts the future of the U.S. economy at risk. Rather than address our legitimate concerns, China has begun to retaliate against U.S. products. There is no justification for such action.”
Continue Reading USTR Proposes Additional 10 Percent Tariff Against Wider Range of Chinese Products Subject to USTR Review and Public Comment