Due to continuing concerns with Huawei Technologies and its non-U.S. affiliates accessing and using U.S. technology and software to design and manufacture its semiconductors, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced that it will further tighten export restrictions on the Chinese conglomerate. Commerce’s  Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) will amend its foreign-produced direct product rule

As reported in a prior post, the United States on July 6, 2018 began imposing 25 percent tariffs on approximately $34 billion worth of Chinese products imported into the United States. This was the result of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) undertaking a Section 301 investigation into “China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation.” Shortly after these tariffs were implemented, China retaliated by imposing tariffs on $34 billion worth of U.S. exports to China. In response, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced yesterday, July 10, 2018, “As a result of China’s retaliation and failure to change its practices, the President has ordered USTR to begin the process of imposing tariffs of 10 percent on an additional $200 billion of Chinese imports.” He added, “For over a year, the Trump Administration has patiently urged China to stop its unfair practices, open its market, and engage in true market competition. We have been very clear and detailed regarding the specific changes China should undertake. Unfortunately, China has not changed its behavior – behavior that puts the future of the U.S. economy at risk. Rather than address our legitimate concerns, China has begun to retaliate against U.S. products. There is no justification for such action.”
Continue Reading USTR Proposes Additional 10 Percent Tariff Against Wider Range of Chinese Products Subject to USTR Review and Public Comment