On May 1, 2024, the State Department published a proposed rule to amend the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and establish an exemption to the licensing requirement for exports, reexports, transfers, or temporary import of defense articles to or within Australia and the United Kingdom. This proposed rule is intended to promote the goals

To “further enhance defense industrial base cooperation and technology innovation with Australia and the United Kingdom,” the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) issued an interim final rule (“IFR”) on April 18, 2024 to ease various licensing requirements prescribed by the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) for exports, reexports, or transfers (in-country) to

On February 23, 2024, the eve before Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine officially enters its third year, the United States issued another sanctions package against Russia, taking particular aim at Russia’s financial sector, energy production revenue streams, and military-industrial complex. Specifically, the package sanctions more than 500 entities and individuals by having them added

Pursuant to the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018 (FIRRMA), the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) established the concept of “excepted foreign state[s],” defined as those states with compliance laws, orders and regulations similar to those of the United States concerning foreign investments assessed for national security purposes.  See

In multiple petitions filed on January 18, 2023, Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (collectively, “the Petitioners”) requested the imposition of antidumping duties on U.S. imports of certain tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet products (“tin mill products”) from Canada, China, Germany, Netherlands

On March 22, 2022, the United States and the United Kingdom reached agreement on allowing “sustainable volumes” of UK steel and aluminum products to enter the U.S. market without the application of Section 232 tariffs. The Joint Statement notes that both the United States and UK will monitor steel and aluminum trade between the countries