On May 12, 2022, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued Syria General License (GL) 22, which authorizes certain transactions, including processing or transfer of funds on behalf of third-country entities, otherwise prohibited under the Syrian Sanctions Regulations (SSR) that are ordinarily incident and necessary to activities in the

The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) recently issued several Russia-related general licenses under the Russian Harmful Foreign Activities Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. Part 587 (RuHSR). These licenses authorize certain activities which would otherwise be prohibited under OFAC sanctions toward Russia:

GL 26A extends until July 12, 2022 existing authorizations for

On May 5, 2022, the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued much anticipated Russia-related general license (GL) 31, “Authorizing Certain Transactions Related to Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights.” GL 31 authorizes certain transactions otherwise prohibited by the Russian Harmful Foreign Activities Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR Part 587 (“RuHSR”) with respect to intellectual

On May 8, 2022, the Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) implemented additional sanctions on several sectors of the Russian economy.  OFAC designated three Russian telecommunications companies and placed them on the Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) list, noting that they are Russian state-controlled television stations generating revenue for the Russian government. 

The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has added multiple new entities and persons to its Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) List after determining that they were involved in attempts to evade U.S. sanctions put in place as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.  OFAC has designated Russian commercial bank PJSC

On April 6, 2022, President Joseph Biden issued Executive Order, “Prohibiting New Investment in and Certain Services to the Russian Federation in Response to Continued Russian Federation Aggression” (the “April 6, 2022 EO”) , further expanding sanctions against Russia, including measures to ban new investments in Russia and authorizations to prohibit the provision of

On March 31, 2022, Secretary of the Treasury Janet Yellen released a Determination expanding the scope of Section 1(a)(i) of Executive Order 14024 to include aerospace, electronics and marine sectors of the Russian economy as being within the scope of the Executive Order.  This Executive Order has been relied upon extensively to implement sanctions against

On March 24, 2022, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued two amended general licenses (GL) and two new GLs involving Russia-related sanctions programs. OFAC has also updated its FAQs 1,023 and 1,024 to reflect the changes in GL 17A.

  • General License 6A: GL 6 authorized transactions prohibited by the Russian Harmful Foreign

On March 24, 2022, President Joseph Biden announced further sanctions toward Russia involving more than 400 individuals and entities, including the Russian Duma and its members, several additional Russian oligarchs, and numerous Russian defense companies.  The sanctions were carried out pursuant to Executive Order 14024 which authorizes sanctions against Russia for its harmful foreign activities. 

On March 18, 2022, the Department of the Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) identified nearly 100 commercial and private aircraft that have allegedly “flown into Russia in apparent violations of the Export administration Regulations (EAR).” The list identifies planes owned by Russian airlines Aeroflot, AirBridgeCargo and Utair as well as Russian oligarch Roman